• Fri - Oct 20 — Jacksonville: Contra
  • Fri - Oct 20 — Melbourne: Contra
  • Fri - Oct 20 — Sarasota: Contra
  • Sat - Oct 21 — Gainesville: Contra
  • Mon - Oct 23 — Gainesville: English Country
  • Tue - Oct 24 — Melbourne: English Country
  • Tue - Oct 24 — Venice Area: English Country
  • Tue - Oct 24 — Lake Worth: Irish Céilí
  • Tue - Oct 24 — Fort Walton: Contra
  • Wed - Oct 25 — Gainesville: Irish
  • Wed - Oct 25 — Tampa: Scandinavian
  • Fri - Oct 27 — Tallahassee: Contra
  • Fri - Oct 27 — Orange Park: English Country
  • Sat - Oct 28 — Pinellas Park: Contra
  • Sat - Oct 28 — McIntosh: Contra
  • Sun - Oct 29 — Coconut Grove: Contra
  • Sun - Oct 29 — Coral Gables: Contra
  • Mon - Oct 30 — Gainesville: English Country
  • Tue - Oct 31 — Melbourne: English Country
  • Tue - Oct 31 — Venice Area: English Country
  • Tue - Oct 31 — Lake Worth: Irish Céilí
  • Tue - Oct 31 — Fort Walton: Contra
  • Wed - Nov 1 — Gainesville: Irish
  • Wed - Nov 1 — Tampa: Scandinavian
  • Fri - Nov 3 — Pinellas Park: Contra
  • Fri - Nov 3 — Orange Park: English Country
  • Sat - Nov 4 — Cocoa Beach: Contra
  • Sat - Nov 4 — Boca Raton: Contra
  • Sun - Nov 5 — Gainesville: Contra
  • Mon - Nov 6 — Gainesville: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 7 — Melbourne: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 7 — Venice Area: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 7 — Lake Worth: Irish Céilí
  • Tue - Nov 7 — Fort Walton: Contra
  • Wed - Nov 8 — Gainesville: Irish
  • Wed - Nov 8 — Tampa: Scandinavian
  • Fri - Nov 10 — Tallahassee: Contra
  • Fri - Nov 10 — Melrose:
  • Fri - Nov 10 — Orange Park: English Country
  • Sat - Nov 11 — Pinellas Park: Contra
  • Sat - Nov 11 —Davie: Contra - spended
  • Sun - Nov 12 — DeLand: English Country
  • Mon - Nov 13 — Gainesville: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 14 — Melbourne: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 14 — Venice Area: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 14 — Lake Worth: Irish Céilí
  • Tue - Nov 14 — Fort Walton: Contra
  • Wed - Nov 15 — Gainesville: Irish
  • Wed - Nov 15 — Tampa: Scandinavian
  • Fri - Nov 17 — Jacksonville: Contra
  • Fri - Nov 17 — Melbourne: Contra
  • Fri - Nov 17 — Sarasota: Contra
  • Sat - Nov 18 — Gainesville: Contra
  • Sun - Nov 19 — Boca Raton: Contra
  • Mon - Nov 20 — Gainesville: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 21 — Melbourne: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 21 — Venice Area: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 21 — Lake Worth: Irish Céilí
  • Tue - Nov 21 — Fort Walton: Contra
  • Wed - Nov 22 — Gainesville: Irish
  • Wed - Nov 22 — Tampa: Scandinavian
  • Fri - Nov 24 — Tallahassee: Contra
  • Fri - Nov 24 — Orange Park: English Country
  • Sat - Nov 25 — Pinellas Park: Contra
  • Sat - Nov 25 —Davie: Contra
  • Mon - Nov 27 — Gainesville: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 28 — Melbourne: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 28 — Venice Area: English Country
  • Tue - Nov 28 — Lake Worth: Irish Céilí
  • Tue - Nov 28 — Fort Walton: Contra
  • Wed - Nov 29 — Gainesville: Irish
  • Wed - Nov 29 — Tampa: Scandinavian
  • Click to Zoom English Country Dance

    History of
    English Country Dance

    History of English Country Dancing


    Various opinions


    Alan Winston
    Gene Murrow
    Earthly Delights
    Wikipedia

    My Comments


    The history of English Country is more murky the above essays imply. What was meant by a "Country Dance" in the time or Queen Elizabeth I? Three possibilities: A village dance such a done by peasants at fairs; A dance form unique to the country manor houses; A dance composed by a dancing master to resemble a village dance. We have no way of knowing, but period paintings of village dancers indicate crude, rowdy behavior hardly compatible with the most casual court activities. I suspect that the country dances performed by or for the queen had been greatly sanitized. The system of precisely describing dance movement (Labonotation) was not developed until around 1720. It was used only for serious dances at that time, not the trivial country dances.

    The Dancing Master first published by John Playford in 1651 is called a collection of country dances. "Collection" in this sense does not necessarily imply a "collector" as understood in the early 20th century. John Playford was a printer; there is no indication that he was a dancer. There appears to have been several individuals who contributed to the Playford collection. Most likely these were dancing masters who contributed their repertoires: Dances which they arranged and taught. While unlikely, it is possible that some of the Playford dances had never been danced before they were published.

    Please do not use perfume or other heavy fragrances before dancing. Living Fragrance Free contains tips for avoiding objectional fragrances.

    All You Need to Know About Relationships can be Learned in a Dance Class.


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